Micro sensor to detect glaucoma before attack
Tuesday 25 April, 2017
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Micro sensor to detect glaucoma before attack

Published On: Fri, Jan 2nd, 2015 | Eye Diseases | By BioNews

Your eye could someday house its own high-tech information center, tracking important changes and letting you know when it’s time to see an eye doctor.

A team of doctors at the University of Washington is developing a small, wireless sensor that can be attached to a lens and implanted in the eye to help detect glaucoma.

Glaucoma is the leading cause of blindness, affecting some 60 million people worldwide. It is highly treatable, provided it is detected early.

The sensor can send data to clinicians in real time.

An illustration of the final device. The device would be placed in an artificial lens with its antenna circling the perimeter, and the sensor and radio frequency chip inside. Image Credit: U of Washington

An illustration of the final device. The device would be placed in an artificial lens with its antenna circling the perimeter, and the sensor and radio frequency chip inside. Image Credit: U of Washington

“No one has ever put electronics inside the lens of the eye, so this is a little more radical,” said Karl Böhringer, a UW professor of electrical engineering and of bioengineering. “We have shown this is possible in principle. If you can fit this sensor device into an intraocular lens implant during cataract surgery, it won’t require any further surgery for patients.”

The disease occurs once fluid pressure inside the eye rises, choking the optic nerve and causing irreparable damage.

To detect this often sudden shift, the sensor on the lens would continually monitor fluid pressure inside the eye.

A micro-chip, also located on the lens, would convert pressure data into a radio-frequency signal and send data to an external receiver.

“The implementation of the monitoring device has to be well-suited clinically and must be designed to be simple and reliable,” Shen said. “We want every surgeon who does cataract surgeries to be able to use this.”

The new sensor is slated for clinical trials in early 2015.

The researchers recently published their results in the Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering and filed patents on an initial prototype of the pressure-monitoring device.

Reference:
Ça?da? Varel and Yi-Chun Shih and Brian P Otis and Tueng S Shen and Karl F Böhringer. A wireless intraocular pressure monitoring device with a solder-filled microchannel antenna. Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering,Volume:24, Issue Num:4.

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