New material promises the thinnest-ever imaging device
Tuesday 21 November, 2017
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New material promises the thinnest-ever imaging device

Published On: Mon, Dec 22nd, 2014 | Nanotechnology | By BioNews

Researchers from the Rice University in the US have developed atomically thin material that may result in the production of the thinnest-ever imaging device.

“There are many two-dimensional materials that can sense light, but none are as efficient as this material,” said Robert Vajtai, a senior faculty fellow.

“This material is 10 times more efficient than the best we have seen before,” Vajtai added.

To develop the material, the researchers synthesised copper indium selenide (CIS), a single-layer matrix of copper, indium and selenium atoms.

As the material is transparent, a CIS-based scanner might use light from one side to illuminate the image on the other for capture.

A schematic shows the design of an optoelectronic memory device based on CIS, a two-dimensional material developed at Rice University. The device traps electrons formed when light hits the material and holds them until released for storage; it could form the basis of future flat imaging devices. (Credit: Ajayan Group/Rice University)

A schematic shows the design of an optoelectronic memory device based on CIS, a two-dimensional material developed at Rice University. The device traps electrons formed when light hits the material and holds them until released for storage; it could form the basis of future flat imaging devices. (Credit: Ajayan Group/Rice University)

The material could also be an important component in two-dimensional electronics that capture images, graduate student Sidong Lei said.

To prove the material’s ability to capture an image, Lei also built a prototype — a three-pixel, charge coupled device (CCD).

CCDs are sensors used in digital cameras and video cameras to record still and moving images

“CIS-based CCDs would be ultra-thin, transparent and flexible, and are the missing piece for things like 2-D imaging devices,” Lei added.

The device traps electrons formed when light hits the material and holds them until released for storage, he said.

The research could lead to the manufacture of tiny, bio-imaging devices that monitor real-time conditions.

The findings appeared this month in the journal Nano Letters.

Reference:

Optoelectronic Memory Using Two-Dimensional Materials. Sidong Lei, Fangfang Wen, Bo Li, Qizhong Wang, Yihan Huang, Yongji Gong, Yongmin He, Pei Dong, James Bellah, Antony George, Liehui Ge, Jun Lou, Naomi J. Halas, Robert Vajtai, and Pulickel M. Ajayan. Nano Letters Article ASAP, DOI: 10.1021/nl503505f

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