Thursday 18 December, 2014

Trifocal lens implants renders glasses unnecessary

Published On: Sun, Sep 30th, 2012 | Eye Diseases | By IANS

A revolutionary new trifocal lens, implanted after cataract surgery, renders glasses redundant. Many patients who had synthetic lenses found their middle-distance vision blurred when they looked at a computer screen.

Consultant ophthalmic surgeon Bobby Qureshi, who uses the new trifocal implant at the London Eye Hospital, says the results are almost instantaneous.

“Traditional multi-focal lenses also cause too much glare for many people. This trifocal lens overcomes these two main drawbacks, providing good all-round vision, with hardly any glare,” he says.

The lens has different focal parts for near, far and intermediate vision.

“Imagine a dartboard with circles coming out from the bullseye in the centre. With this trifocal lens, the centre circle is for focusing far away, the next is for close-up vision and the next is for everything in between,” says Qureshi, the Daily Mail reports.

“The brain instinctively chooses which part to concentrate on and which to ignore. The patient can see near and far and everywhere around them, unlike with a pair of varifocal or bifocal glasses. It is also an excellent option for active, short-sighted people who find glasses would get in the way,” says Qureshi.

The operation Qureshi performs to insert the implant is bladeless. It is carried out under local anaesthetic using a state-of-the-art computer-guided laser and takes just a few minutes.

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