Saturday 25 October, 2014

Potential treatment to get rid of scars on skin discovered

Published On: Sun, Jul 8th, 2012 | Skin care | By BioNews

A new research has offered a new strategy to reduce or eliminate scars on the skin.

Specifically, scientists from New York University have described how agents that block receptors for adenosine (a molecule generated from ATP which is used by the body to provide energy to muscles) can be applied topically to healing wounds to reduce scar size, yielding skin that feels more like the original, unscarred skin.

“Scars can be disfiguring and, if extensive enough, can lead to diminished function and quality of life,” said Bruce N. Cronstein, M.D., a researcher involved in the work from the Division of Translational Medicine in the Department of Medicine at New York University School of Medicine in New York, NY.

“We hope that our findings may lead to new agents that diminish scarring and disfigurement following burns, wounds, or even illnesses that destroy skin and lead to a better quality of life for victims of these traumas,” he stated.

When the skin or other tissues are wounded, ATP leaks from the damaged cells and is then converted to adenosine, which promotes healing. Scars form when adenosine continues to be produced at the wound site after the injury is healed, leading to larger, thicker scars than what may have otherwise been there.

To study the possibility of reducing scar sizes, Cronstein and colleagues studied wounds on the backs of mice. After the wound closed, the adenosine A2A receptor antagonist was applied. They found that the adenosine A2A receptor agonist prevented excessive scar tissue in the treated mice.

The research appeared in the FASEB Journal.

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