Friday 31 October, 2014

Obesity hormone ups risk of osteoporosis, fractures

Published On: Wed, Nov 2nd, 2011 | Rheumatology | By BioNews

The body’s obesity hormones are linked to osteoporosis and an increased risk of fractures, a new study has said.

According to the researchers at the Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Sweden, adiponectin is linked to osteoporosis along with being an important cause of cardiovascular disease.

Through the research, Dan Mellstrom and his colleagues have shown that people with raised levels of adiponectin also have more fragile skeletons and more fractures, as well as reduced muscle strength and lower muscle mass, increasing the risk of fractures.

High adiponectin also seems to be related to increased functional ageing.

“High levels of adiponectin in the elderly seem to be associated with both reduced functioning of the musculature and a more fragile skeleton,” Mellstrom said.

“This means a higher risk of fractures and falls, and also increased mortality,” he added.

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