Wednesday 23 April, 2014

Now, electronic system in car will force teens to drive safely, lower stereo volume

Published On: Fri, Sep 2nd, 2011 | Transportation Science | By BioNews

Worried about your teenage son or daughter driving your car? Well worry no more, as an electronic system has been developed that will force them to drive safely and even lower the stereo volume.

The electronic system, which will be fitted to new Ford cars from next year, will force motorists to drive safely by limiting the car’s top speed.

The safety feature, which has already been dubbed “teenage mode”, springs into action when the young driver uses a special second car key.

Officially known as MyKey, the system is programmable by parents, allowing them to set a top speed of between 45mph and 80mph.

Once the car reaches a certain speed, a chime sounds, and the car plays a spoken warning to slow down.

The system also features an early warning when the driver is running low on fuel.

Another safety feature is “emergency assistance” in the event of a crash serious enough to trigger the passenger airbags.

If there is such a collision, the car’s on-board computer will send a message through the mobile phone network to the emergency services. The message will include the co-ordinates of the accident.

It is not only “boy racers” whose antics will be curtailed, but teenage girl drivers, too.

“It’s targeted at young drivers, though it is useful for fleet operators as well,” the Daily Mail quoted Paul Mascarena, Ford’s chief technical officer, as saying of MyKey.

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