Thursday 28 August, 2014

Why stress damages DNA

Published On: Mon, Aug 22nd, 2011 | Biochemistry | By BioNews

Researchers at Duke University Medical Centre have discovered a mechanism that could explain why stress causes DNA damage.

“We believe this paper is the first to propose a specific mechanism through which a hallmark of chronic stress, elevated adrenaline, could eventually cause DNA damage that is detectable,” said senior author Robert J. Lefkowitz, M.D., James B. Duke Professor of Medicine and Biochemistry and a Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) investigator at Duke University Medical Centre.

“This could give us a plausible explanation of how chronic stress may lead to a variety of human conditions and disorders, which range from merely cosmetic, like greying hair, to life-threatening disorders like malignancies,” Lefkowitz said.

P53 is a tumour suppressor protein and is considered a “guardian of the genome” – one that prevents genomic abnormalities.

“The study showed that chronic stress leads to prolonged lowering of p53 levels,” said Makoto Hara, Ph.D., a postdoctoral fellow in the Lefkowitz laboratory. “We hypothesize that this is the reason for the chromosomal irregularities we found in chronically stressed mice.”

Leave a comment

XHTML: You can use these html tags: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

More from Biochemistry
  • Researchers Reveal the Physiological Role of a Novel Hormone FNDC5/irisin
  • Venom from snakes could save lives too
  • Cholesterol inhibitors block lymphatic vessel growth
  • Soon, computers to predict negative side effects of drugs
  • New therapeutic target against atherosclerosis identified
  • Visit us on Google+