Saturday 30 August, 2014

Sudden sleep syndrome may hit kids after swine flu jab

Published On: Sun, Apr 24th, 2011 | Flu | By BioNews

A swine flu jab administered to thousands of children is likely to cause sleep disorders. Symptoms include excessive daytime sleepiness and nodding off suddenly without warning.

All packets of the vaccine Pandemrix will have to carry a warning following a ruling by the European Medicines Agency (EMA).

The EMA, which is currently investigating the effects of the vaccine, has also told doctors to weigh up the potential risks before injecting children against the deadly H1N1 virus.

There have been seven reported cases of narcolepsy in Britain linked to the GlaxoSmithKline vaccine – four of them children, reports the Daily Mail.

The condition can also cause temporary muscle paralysis, hallucinations and problems
concentrating.

Caroline Hadfield, of Frome, Somerset, aged 40, believes her five-year-old son Joshua contracted narcolepsy after being vaccinated with Pandemrix last January.

Within weeks of having the jab, Joshua began sleeping 18 hours a day and Hadfield says
his personality completely changed. “I believe this link will eventually be confirmed. I’m very angry about it.

“I researched the vaccine carefully before agreeing to let Joshua have it and thought I was protecting him. Now he’s saddled with this for life.”

Pandemrix was introduced in the swine flu pandemic of 2009. It has been given to six million people. The British government recommended all children under five should have immunisation during the initial outbreak.

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