Wednesday 23 April, 2014

Single-lens distance glasses can cut falls in active older adults

Published On: Wed, May 26th, 2010 | Health | By BioNews

Older adults should replace multifocal glasses with single lens distance glasses to reduce their chances of suffering falls, according to a new research.

Experts opine that it can be especially useful to aged people who regularly take part in outdoor activities.

Presbyopia (a progressively diminished ability to focus on near objects) is the most common form of impaired vision in older people. To correct for this condition, people are either prescribed separate single lens glasses for distant and near vision or, for convenience, a single pair of multifocal (bifocal, trifocal, or progressive lens) glasses.

Multifocal glasses have benefits for tasks that require changes in focal length, such as driving, shopping and cooking. But they also have optical defects which can impair balance and increase the risk of falls in older people.

So researchers in Sydney, Australia set out to test whether giving older people an additional pair of single lens distance glasses for wearing when outdoors or in unfamiliar settings would help to reduce falls.

The study involved 606 people who were at high risk of falling (either aged 80+ years or aged 65+ years with a history of falls). All participants used multifocal glasses at least three times a week when walking outdoors and did not use single lens distance glasses.

Participants were randomly split into an intervention and a control group. After an initial examination by an optometrist, 305 intervention participants were prescribed a pair of single lens distance glasses for wearing outdoors and in unfamiliar settings, and were instructed in their use. They were also shown how multifocal glasses can increase the risk of falls.

The remaining control participants had the same optometrist examination as the intervention group but were not provided with single lens glasses and received no falls prevention advice.

Participants were monitored for 13 months. During that time, total falls in the intervention group were reduced by 8 percent compared with the control group. For those who regularly went outdoors, all falls, outside falls and injurious falls decreased significantly – by about 40 percent. However, for those who spent more time inside, outside falls increased significantly.

The intervention did not influence physical activity or improve quality of life.

Based on these findings, the authors recommend that older people who take part in regular outdoor activities should be provided with single lens distance glasses for outside use when they are prescribed their first pair of multifocal glasses. However, those who undertake little outdoor activity should use multifocal glasses for most activities, rather than using multiple pairs of glasses.

The study has been study published on bmj.com.

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