Human pain-controlling molecule’s structure identified
Wednesday 05 August, 2015

Human pain-controlling molecule’s structure identified

Published On: Thu, Jul 12th, 2007 | Biochemistry | By BioNews

July 12 : Researchers have unveiled the structure of a key molecule called ‘P2X receptor’ that control pain in humans.

The research might lead to the development of painkillers for recurring migraine and backache.

The study was conducted by a team of researchers including Dr Chris Thompson, Professor Alan North and Dr Sam Fountain at The University of Manchester.

Researchers examined slime moulds, microscopic amoeboid organisms to closely study the ‘P2X receptors’.

Researchers found that the human P2X and the slime mould equivalent was 10 percent similar and suggest on the basis of evolutionary theory that these similar parts of the molecule probably regulated pain in humans.

“By looking at slime mould we were effectively able to turn the evolutionary clock back a billion years to see how a more primitive P2X molecule functions,” Nature quoted Thompson, as saying.

“Inhibiting P2X as a potential pain-relief therapy would be the Holy Grail of rational drug design and could revolutionise the way we manage chronic pain conditions like back pain and migraine,” he added. (ANI)

Leave a comment

XHTML: You can use these html tags: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

More from Biochemistry
  • Researchers detect new role for proteins
  • Making the most of a shitty situation – What the “fecal prints” of microbes can tell us about Earth’s evolution
  • Molecule identified to fight oxidative stress
  • Monkey lesson: Eat less to live longer
  • New Inhibitors of Elusive Enzymes Promise to Be Valuable Scientific Tools